Pete
ADHD COACH 
ADDICTION &
TEEN SPECIALIST 

DIAGNOSED COMBINED ADHD

Pete was diagnosed with Combined ADHD at the age of 39.  He was very relieved to finally know what was going on because he was getting sick and tired of inconsistent results at work, being mostly brilliant and a high achiever but also losing numerous weekends to catching up and amending the errors he had made.  It hadn’t made sense.  Till that diagnosis.  Until then Pete had no idea that ‘inattention’ and ‘making small mistakes’ were part of a neurological condition and not just his own ineptitude.

Pete came across the symptoms of ADHD during one of his many internet searches, trying to figure out just why he seemed to be so different.

Throughout school Pete had struggled with concentration, low self esteem and was very easily distracted.  An ADHD diagnosis was completely missed during school, however Pete was diagnosed with Dyslexia at college where he’d gone to resit his GCSEs.  Sadly the only thing he left college with was that diagnosis and none of the intended qualifications.

Choosing to work with people after school, Pete spent eight years working with Adults with Learning and Physical Disabilities.  This is where Pete’s passion for helping others really took off.  He had always been empathic to others after helping his grandmother who had Rheumatoid Arthritis. He knew he had found his vocation in helping others.

During Pete’s early twenties he was diagnosed with Substance Use Disorder.  After two failed rehab attempts, Pete optimistically completed a third and remained abstinent from all alcohol and drugs for fifteen years, during which time he was also diagnosed with anxiety.  Pete believed that this was the last diagnosis he would get and that all of his troubles were from substances, dyslexia and anxiety.

Not being one to leave friends behind and still passionate about helping people, Pete set up a Support Group for others wanting to lead a substance-free life, in his local town.  These support group meetings carry on to this day and now happen seven days a week across the county he lives in. Pete gets huge satisfaction from voluntarily mentoring young men as they start a life free from drugs.

Professionally, Pete began working with young people who were either homeless or vulnerably housed.  He was working with clients who had just been given their own accommodation as well as those still in homeless hostels.  Many of the young people were involved in crime, drugs and were not in education, training or employment. The clients regularly asked to swap their own key worker for Pete as ‘he understood them’. Pete now looks back and thinks this is probably because most if not all of them were also ADHD.

Pete then moved on to set up a Recovery based project in the Drug and Alcohol field.  A passionate advocate for other people, Pete has spent the last five years managing an Advocacy Service in a large, medium-secure mental health hospital.  This work allowed him to hold patient meetings with clients who were considered ‘very dangerous’.  Pete’s easy ways and genuine non-judgmental manner meant there were never any issues and he got on extremely well with all the clients.

Although abstinent over this period of time, with the as yet unknown ADHD not identified, Pete’s compulsive eating saw his weight balloon from ten to twenty three stone.

Once he was diagnosed ADHD Pete’s life changed dramatically.  He realised his work had been all consuming and swallowed up the time he should have been spending with his young family.  He knew he needed to reduce his weight drastically and he knew he needed to be 100% honest with his doctor.  This was a must now he was being offered stimulant medication to treat his ADHD.

Eventually Pete settled on the non stimulant medication and now finally feels his ADHD is being medicated properly.  He has taken getting on the right medication very seriously and has undertaken a Psychiatric genealogy DNA test and is also one of the first 1000 legal medical cannabis patients in the UK.

Fortunately Pete has had successful treatment for his ADHD.  His weight is now normal, he has recovered from any substance abuse issues and has since retrained as a Coach.  Now he devotes his time to supporting clients who have found themselves in need of support to understand their ADHD, conquer their demons and realise their dreams.

Pete has first hand, professional and voluntary experience with the criminal justice system.  He has been published in ‘Inside Time’, the prisoners newspaper, on more than one occasion and regularly spends time with ex-offenders who are living very different lives to the ones they may have been doing before they met Pete.

Pete also writes books.  Author of sixteen published novels, Pete is currently writing about his own experience of undiagnosed ADHD.

Sharing his life story by public speaking gives Pete the opportunity to spread ADHD awareness.  He can also be found doing occasional stand up comedy when he can muster up the courage.

Pete is thrilled now to be working with Headstuff ADHD Therapy coaching and mentoring teenagers, young adults and adults.  He is passionate about helping clients struggling with addiction, offending behaviour, anxiety, phase transition and life planning.

 

Qualifications

  • Diploma in Life Coaching Level 3 2021
  • Certificate in Leadership & Management 2013
  • Certificate in Counselling Skills & Theory Level 3 2010
  • Certificate in Counselling Skills Level 2 2008
  • Certificate In Introduction to Counselling Skills Level 1 2007
 
 

Pete
ADHD COACH
ADDICTION &
TEEN SPECIALIST

DIAGNOSED COMBINED ADHD

Pete was diagnosed with Combined ADHD at the age of 39.  He was very relieved to finally know what was going on because he was getting sick and tired of inconsistent results at work, being mostly brilliant and a high achiever but also losing numerous weekends to catching up and amending the errors he had made.  It hadn’t made sense.  Till that diagnosis.  Until then Pete had no idea that ‘inattention’ and ‘making small mistakes’ were part of a neurological condition and not just his own ineptitude.

Pete came across the symptoms of ADHD during one of his many internet searches, trying to figure out just why he seemed to be so different.

Throughout school Pete had struggled with concentration, low self esteem and was very easily distracted.  An ADHD diagnosis was completely missed during school, however Pete was diagnosed with Dyslexia at college where he’d gone to resit his GCSEs.  Sadly the only thing he left college with was that diagnosis and none of the intended qualifications.

Choosing to work with people after school, Pete spent eight years working with Adults with Learning and Physical Disabilities.  This is where Pete’s passion for helping others really took off.  He had always been empathic to others after helping his grandmother who had Rheumatoid Arthritis.  He knew he had found his vocation in helping others.

During Pete’s early twenties he was diagnosed with Substance Use Disorder.  After two failed rehab attempts, Pete optimistically completed a third and remained abstinent from all alcohol and drugs for fifteen years, during which time he was also diagnosed with anxiety.  Pete believed that this was the last diagnosis he would get and that all of his troubles were from substances, dyslexia and anxiety.

Not being one to leave friends behind and still passionate about helping people, Pete set up a Support Group for others wanting to lead a substance-free life, in his local town.  These support group meetings carry on to this day and now happen seven days a week across the county he lives in.  Pete gets huge satisfaction from voluntarily mentoring young men as they start a life free from drugs.

Professionally, Pete began working with young people who were either homeless or vulnerably housed.  He was working with clients who had just been given their own accommodation as well as those still in homeless hostels.  Many of the young people were involved in crime, drugs and were not in education, training or employment.  The clients regularly asked to swap their own key worker for Pete as ‘he understood them’. Pete now looks back and thinks this is probably because most if not all of them were also ADHD.

Pete then moved on to set up a Recovery based project in the Drug and Alcohol field.  A passionate advocate for other people, Pete has spent the last five years managing an Advocacy Service in a large, medium-secure mental health hospital.  This work allowed him to hold patient meetings with clients who were considered ‘very dangerous’.  Pete’s easy ways and genuine non-judgmental manner meant there were never any issues and he got on extremely well with all the clients.

Although abstinent over this period of time, with the as yet unknown ADHD not identified, Pete’s compulsive eating saw his weight balloon from ten to twenty three stone.

Once he was diagnosed ADHD Pete’s life changed dramatically.  He realised his work had been all consuming and swallowed up the time he should have been spending with his young family.  He knew he needed to reduce his weight drastically and he knew he needed to be 100% honest with his doctor.  This was a must now he was being offered stimulant medication to treat his ADHD.

Eventually Pete settled on the non stimulant medication and now finally feels his ADHD is being medicated properly.  He has taken getting on the right medication very seriously and has undertaken a Psychiatric genealogy DNA test and is also one of the first 1000 legal medical cannabis patients in the UK.

Fortunately Pete has had successful treatment for his ADHD.  His weight is now normal, he has recovered from any substance abuse issues and has since retrained as a Coach.  Now he devotes his time to supporting clients who have found themselves in need of support to understand their ADHD, conquer their demons and realise their dreams.

Pete has first hand, professional and voluntary experience with the criminal justice system.  He has been published in ‘Inside Time’, the prisoners newspaper, on more than one occasion and regularly spends time with ex-offenders who are living very different lives to the ones they may have been doing before they met Pete.

Pete also writes books.  Author of sixteen published novels, Pete is currently writing about his own experience of undiagnosed ADHD.

Sharing his life story by public speaking gives Pete the opportunity to spread ADHD awareness.  He can also be found doing occasional stand up comedy when he can muster up the courage.

Pete is thrilled now to be working with Headstuff ADHD Therapy coaching and mentoring teenagers, young adults and adults.  He is passionate about helping clients struggling with addiction, offending behaviour, anxiety, phase transition and life planning.

 

Qualifications

  • Diploma in Life Coaching Level 3 2021
  • Certificate in Leadership & Management 2013
  • Certificate in Counselling Skills & Theory Level 3 2010
  • Certificate in Counselling Skills Level 2 2008
  • Certificate In Introduction to Counselling Skills Level 1 2007